Rohingya Refugees - The Humanitarian Crisis You May Not Have Heard About

Posted on November 06, 2017

Rohingya Refugees - The Humanitarian Crisis You May Not Have Heard About

The Rohingya are people that live mostly in the Western side of the nation of Myanmar (formerly Burma). With an estimated population of approximately 1,000,000, the Rohingya represent only 1.5% of the total population of Myanmar. While they have lived predominantly in the Rakhine region of country for centuries, they are not considered Burmese, have no citizenship status, and have no legal right to land in the country. From a strict view of the law, they are illegal squatters whose use of the land is contingent upon the grace of the Burmese govt and people.

Though the relationship between the majority Buddhist population and the minority Rohingya population has always been strenuous, historically, the tension was mostly kept in check during the period when Myanmar was under strict military rule. As the country transitioned from military rule to civilian rule, the religious tension between the two groups became pronounced, and has been worsened by nationalistic fervor and influential community leader’s instigation.
The strained relationship gave way to violence in May when the rape and death of a Buddhist woman was blamed on the Rohingya. This incident, which first gave birth to retribution from the majority population, has now spiraled into widespread violence against the Rohingya population. Since the violence is being perpetrated by both the civilian population and govt forces, many observers have called the violence against the Rohingya a form of ethnic cleansing.
The attitude of the Burmese govt can be summed up by comments made by Thein Sein, the President of Myanmar, during an address to the U.N. In this speech, he said the solution to ethnic enmity in Myanmar's western Rakhine state was to either send the Rohingya to a third country or have the UNHCR look after them.
To flee the violence, the Rohingya are pouring into neighboring Bangladesh in the tens of thousands. This year, the rate has been around 20,000 a day since August. While the Bangladeshi’s have taken in some Rohingya, there is general push back as the Rohingya are viewed as a drain on the already limited resource of the nation. In Bangladesh, the refugees are not granted citizenship. In some refugee camps, they are neither allowed to work, see a doctor, or go to school.
Life Change exists to help people such as the Rohingya! Through the Life Change Platform, you will be able to contribute to the ongoing efforts to aid the Rohingya by donating funds that you are earn as you interact on the platform to Life Change wallets or the wallets of your favorite humanitarian organization.
To find out more about how you will be able to help, please visit www.christcoins.io and read our white paper and marketing deck 
To help the Rohingya now, please visit an NGO such as one of these organizations linked below
www.unicefusa.org www.rescue.org www.partners.ngo www.care.org
www.concernworldwide.org www.christianaid.org www.savethechildren.org

If you can help your neighbor now, don't say, "Come back tomorrow, and then I'll help you."
– Proverbs 3:28 (NLT)